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Images of Wales

A Visit to Aberllynfi and Talgarth, Breconshire

Where's that?? - locate Aberllynfi and Talgarth on a map of South Wales.

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Talgarth

Talgarth is a pleasant small market town at the south-western end of the Black Mountains range. Talgarth is also the name of the rural parish in which the town is situated. Talgarth has historical connections with the names of Brychan and Gwendoline in the age of the Celtic Saints. The town provides a livestock market for the local farming community. At present its population is 1,319. In 1860, Tallis's Topographical Dictionary of England and Wales described Talgarth thus:

TALGARTH is agreeably situated upon the banks of the Llyffni [Llynfi] river, and presents a neat, and rather cheerful appearance. This place was an ancient borough. In this parish the extensive tract called the Black-mountain is included.

Inn, Somersetshire Hotel. - Fairs, Feb. 2, March 12, April 18, May 31, July 10, Sep. 23, Nov. 2, Dec. 3, stock, pigs.

The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (published 1868) offered the following description:

TALGARTH, a parish in the hundred of the same name, county Brecon, 7 miles S.W, of Hay, its post town, and 9 from Brecon. It has stations on the Mid Wales and Brecon and Merthyr railways. It is situated on the river Llyffin [Llynfi], under Pen-cader-fawr, among the Black mountains, and near the river Ennig. Talgarth is a borough by prescription, but without privilege or municipal jurisdiction. It was also a market town, and had a castle at Dinas Hill..... The surface abounds in hilly sheep walks..... The church, dedicated to St Gwendeline, is old, with a tower containing six bells.... The Wesleyans and Independents have chapels. Trefeccan House stands on the Llangorse road, and is the place where Howel Harris founded his sect in 1752.... Fairs are held on 2nd February, 12th March, 31st May, 10th July, 23rd September, 2nd November, and 3rd December, for cattle.

View a modern Ordnance Survey map showing the town of Talgarth.

Talgarth
Above: Talgarth viewed from the northwest.
The tower of St Gwendoline's Church is left of centre; the Black Mountains form the backdrop.

St Gwendoline's Church
Above: St Gwendoline's, the parish church of Talgarth.
Parts of the church date back to the 13th century. The nave was rebuilt circa 1400. The west tower contains a ring of six bells, originally cast by Abraham Rudhall of Gloucester in 1724, but one was recast in 1904.

Howell Harris (1714-1773)
St Gwendoline's Church has a famous connection with the Methodist Revival. It was here, at a Holy Communion Service in 1735, that Howell Harris was converted. Sometimes described as the Luther of Wales, Howell Harris worked tirelessly, and travelled some 80,000 miles over rough roads and terrain for 17 years to preach, whatever the conditions, to all who would listen. In 1752, he established a community occupied in agriculture and rural industries at Trefeca in Talgarth parish. Also at Trefeca, in 1768, the Countess of Huntingdon founded a Methodist college. Ironically, Howell Harris remained loyal to the Anglican Church and many thousands attended his funeral at St Gwendoline's Church in 1773. There is a marble memorial to Howell Harris inside the church, in front of the altar rails.

Talgarth
Above: Back Church Street hill, leading from the church down to the town square.

Bridge End Inn
Above: The Bridge End Inn public house, near the bridge over the River Enig.

Bell Hotel passage
Above: A narrow alleyway adjacent to the Bell Hotel in the centre of Talgarth.
  River Enig
Above: The River Enig flowing almost unnoticed through this part of the town.

Town square
Above: The town square, Talgarth.

Olde Mason's Arms
Above: The Olde Mason's Arms Hotel.

The Strand
Above: The Strand bookshop, on the corner of Regent Street (right) and Bell Street (left).
Regent Street is part of the A479 route south from Talgarth through a mountain pass to Crickhowell.

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Details of each website feature (for newcomers) Direct links to each website feature (for regulars) Advance news of new developments on my website Summary of all the latest updates Gateway to Welsh Family History Archive Help for those having problems accessing my website A link to the main 'gateway' page to my entire website