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St Gwynnog's Church, Llanwnnog, Montgomeryshire

Photography (1st photo): Ellie Thomas
Date: 27 March 2008
Camera: Pentacon DCZ5.8 digital

Photography (remaining photos): Shirley Frost
Date: 28 June 2008
Camera: Fuji FinePix F601 Zoom digital

Denomination: Anglican

Dedication: St Gwynnog

Built: 13th (possibly) and 15th centuries

Rebuilt: 1862


Notes:
1. There is an obvious change in the masonry of each side wall of the single chamber between the 13th century western part and the 15th century eastern part. The squared blocks have come from the Roman fort here. A fine screen and loft of circa 1500 [see photograph below] with the usual motifs of vine trails, cresting and Perpendicular tracery divides the two parts. There is a monument to one of the Pryce family who died in 1699.
[Extracted from The Old Parish Churches of Mid Wales by Mike Salter, Folly Publications, Malvern, Worcestershire, 2003 (2nd edition); ISBN 1-8711731-62-3]
2. St Gwynnog's church is claimed to have been founded in the 6th century, a daughter church of Llandinam. Certainly the dedication and the previously curvilinear churchyard suggest an early medieval origin. The church is a single-chambered structure, variously considered to be of 13th or 15th century date and restored in 1863. It contains the best example of a 15th or 16th century rood screen and loft in Montgomeryshire [see photograph below], a medieval font bowl and one 17th century memorial, though little else pre-dating the restoration. The church is set in a raised enclosure which was originally curvilinear before being enlarged in the 19th century. It has been claimed that the walls of the church are 13th century and that the building was extended eastwards in the 15th century. Certainly the east window is 15th century but there is no firm evidence of a 13th century structure or of an extension, though it does seem reasonable to assume that some of the walling is medieval. Some red sandstone dressings are believed to have been brought from the Roman settlement at Caersws, but this, too, is unproven. The western part of the north wall and probably the east end of the south wall have been rebuilt, though it is impossible to determine when. The church was restored in 1862/63 in Perpendicular style, and it is possible that the rebuilding forms part of that episode. Similarly the top of the south wall has been replaced. This too could be 19th century work. The west wall was rebuilt in 1982 using old material.
[Adapted from the Clwyd-Powys Archaeological Trust (CPAT) website, where further details are provided]

St Gwynnog's Church, Llanwnnog
St Gwynnog's Church, Llanwnnog
St Gwynnog's Church, Llanwnnog
St Gwynnog's Church, Llanwnnog
St Gwynnog's Church, Llanwnnog
St Gwynnog's Church, Llanwnnog
St Gwynnog's Church, Llanwnnog
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